[ Summary Version ]

 

Chapter 3 : Community Facilities

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1. Introduction

2. Education Facilities

3. Medical and Health Facilities

4. Police Stations

5. Magistracies

6. Correctional Facilities

7. Fire Service Facilities

8. Ambulance Service Facilities

9. Arts Venues

10. Community Halls and Social Welfare Facilities

11. Post Office

12. Public Mortuaries

13. Funeral Depots and Parlours

14. Summary


December 2014 Edition

1. Introduction


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1.1 Satisfactory housing and adequate employment opportunities are basic to the maintenance of an appropriate standard of living. A wide range of community facilities is also necessary and one of the functions of the Hong Kong Planning Standards and Guidelines (HKPSG) is to make an assessment of the land requirements for community uses. With an increasing urban population and the shortage of suitable flat land, high residential densities will still have to be accepted. This will require a corresponding growth in the provision of community services. The following facilities, whether provided by Government or by the private sector, are covered in this Chapter :

(a) Education facilities

(b) Medical and health facilities

(c) Police stations

(d) Magistracies

(e) Correctional Facilities

(f) Fire service and ambulance service facilities

(g) Arts Venues

(h) Community halls and social welfare facilities

(i) Post offices

(j) Public mortuaries

(k) Funeral depots and parlours

Other services and facilities are discussed in Chapters 4 to 12

1.2 In determining the scale of provision of these community facilities, account has been taken of the expected growing demands for more generous space standards and a wider range of outlets for social activities in the long-term. These demands are likely to increase as a consequence of trends such as a broader distribution of wealth, more leisure time, higher standards of education and a greater public awareness of the importance of improving quality of urban life. At the same time, considerations of finance and other practical limitations will need to be taken into account in deriving new standards.

1.3 Many of the standards for the provision of community facilities recommended in this document are based upon the growth or concentration of population in a given area. The standards have been formulated in the light of conditions in existing urban areas or envisaged for new towns, where large population is or will be concentrated. Special consideration must also be given to the provision of community facilities in the less densely populated areas of the New Territories. Many of these are unlikely to reach a population which would warrant the provision of facilities on the basis of the standards recommended. In these areas, certain facilities such as clinics have been provided in the past on a smaller scale than in the urban areas and it is recommended that this policy should continue.

1.4 Guidelines for Sensitive Community Facilities

1.4.1 Sensitive community facilities are facilities which, due to the specific service(s) provided therein, may cause unease and concern to the people living in the neighbourhood.

1.4.2 In general, these facilities can be classified into two groups:

(a) Group A

Facilities of territorial importance serving the wider public but not specific client users and who would not require frequent services of the facilities: these facilities include correctional facilities, public mortuaries, funeral depots and parlours.

(b) Group B

Facilities of more local or district significance serving specific client users who would require frequent services of the facilities: these facilities include special medical and health clinics, education facilities and social welfare services such as hostels and day centres for discharged mental patients and severely mentally handicapped persons.

  Locational Factors

1.4.3 While the detailed site and locational requirements of community facilities will be discussed in the later sections according to types, some general planning principles of locating sensitive community facilities should be considered as follows:

(a) Land use compatibility aspect should, as a matter of principle for planning of all facilities, be a primary consideration in locating sensitive community facilities.

(b) Apart from land use compatibility, the nature of services offered, the target users and visitors, the frequency of the target users requiring services of the community facilities and the possible public's reactions to these facilities would also be important in considering the choices of their locations.

(c) Group A facilities would normally require stand-alone sites and should preferably not be located directly next to or at a close distance from residential development and non-sensitive community facilities. Where some of the Group A facilities unavoidably have to be located close to developments, buffer areas with physical barriers should be provided to separate sensitive community facilities from existing and planned developments.

(d) In locating Group B facilities, the concept in favour of integrating these facilities with the local community rather than segregation should be encouraged wherever possible to meet social objectives and the policy of rehabilitation, though there could be opposition from some general public members to these facilities in their neighbourhood mainly due to groundless fear. Optimum utilization should be made of the community facilities and provisions in the neighbourhood to achieve community integration and joint user development should be considered for optimum site utilization in locating Group B facilities.

(e) In case there are strong and valid justifications for certain Group B facilities not to be located near residential or other development areas, the client bureaux/departments for the Group B facilities should provide clear site identification criteria for a suitable site to be reserved by Planning Department.  Joint user development should also be considered as far as possible for optimum site utilization.

(f) The accessibility and the transport needs of staff, users and visitors to the facilities should be duly considered for both Group A and Group B facilities despite that Group A facilities could be located further away from populated areas.

(g) It may be necessary to provide clear signage to ensure undisturbed access to some Group B facilities for staff, users and visitors of the facilities where appropriate.

1.4.4 Public Consultation for Sensitive Community Facilities

(a) In the planning process on reservation of specific sensitive community facilities, the project proponent should, at early stage, consult Home Affairs Department and the respective District Office to formulate a public consultation strategy to gain community support. Depending on the nature of the proposed facilities, it is necessary to identify at an early stage the target consultees and the proper consultation channel.  The background for the need of such facilities and the reasons explaining the choice of sites should be clearly set out in the consultation.  The scope of consultation should be wide enough to allow all relevant parties, i.e. the District Councils, other relevant local groups and associations representing the public views to be informed of the subject matter and to have opportunities for making comments.

(b) Extra efforts would likely be required to foster the public's understanding and acceptance of the sensitive community facilities, particularly the Group B facilities.  The concept of community integration should be stressed during consultation to gain local support where appropriate.  The consultees should be informed of the results of the consultation exercise.  All comments raised during consultation should be properly responded to.  Proper records of the public consultation should also be kept for record purpose as well as for undertaking any necessary follow-up actions.


2. Education Facilities

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2.1 Background

2.1.1 The Education Commission (EC) completed a comprehensive review of the education system in September 2000 and submitted the Report on "Reform Proposals for the Education System in Hong Kong" to the Government.  In October 2000, the Chief Executive announced in his Policy Address that the EC's recommendations had been accepted.  The planning standards and guidelines set out below have mainly incorporated these recommendations.

2.2 Standards

  Nursery Classes and Kindergartens

2.2.1 Whilst the reservation of sites specifically for nursery classes and kindergartens is usually not necessary, the need for such establishments is taken into account in housing estates and large-scale private development projects where space is allocated for such uses. The standard should be 730 half-day and 250 full-day places for every 1 000 children in the age group of 3 to under 6. The recommended size of a kindergarten should be a minimum of 6 classrooms with a total accommodation of 180 pupils per session. Where necessary, kindergartens with more than 6 classrooms may be considered with regard to district characteristics and site conditions.

  Primary Schools

Primary School Designs

2.2.2 For planning purpose, and as a general reference to facilitate the identification and reservation of sites for primary schools, the Architectural Services Department has prepared three different indicative designs for the 30-classroom, 24-classroom and 18-classroom primary schools respectively.  Figures 1, 2 and 3 show the general block layout plans for these school designs.  According to these general block layout plans, the reference site areas required are as follows:

(a) 30-classroom primary school : 6 200m2 with a minimum width of 65m (95m x 65m);

(b) 24-classroom primary school : 4 700m2 with a minimum width of 55m (85m x 55m); and

(c) 18-classroom primary school : 3 950m2 with a minimum width of 55m (72m x 55m)

2.2.3 Notwithstanding the availability of three different designs, as a general principle, consideration should be given to reserve sites with adequate area to accommodate 30-classroom primary schools to achieve higher site utilisation.  However, where it is impossible to reserve enough 30-classroom school sites to meet the demand for school places in a particular district, suitable smaller sites should be reserved for 24-classroom and then 18-classroom primary schools, in that order of priority.

2.2.4 As far as possible, sites reserved should not only meet the reference sizes but also be suitably configured to accommodate the school buildings and the necessary supporting facilities such as ball courts, bus lay-bys and car parking spaces.  Should circumstances not permit the provision of car parking spaces within the school curtilage, they should be provided in convenient locations close to the school buildings.

2.2.5 The Secretary for Education is, however, prepared to exercise greater flexibility in considering primary school sites which are found suitable for primary school use but with sizes not meeting the reference site requirements as stipulated in para. 2.2.2, or sites which meet the reference site requirements but are not suitably configured.  When such sites are identified, advice should be sought from the Secretary for Education and the Director of Architectural Services.

2.2.6 School designs should be site and client specific to enable schools to be flexibly designed to reflect their individual identity as a physical manifestation of the different education themes adopted by different schools.

2.2.7 In order to better utilise and to address different site constraints, the Secretary for Education may also consider allowing greater innovations in school building design, e.g. high-rise schools, joint development school buildings, etc., for individual cases, subject to the arrangements agreed within the Administration on the adoption of flexible design for school building.  The proposed joint use should however be compatible with the function of the school.

  Provision Standard

2.2.8 The provision of primary schools should be based on a standard of one whole-day classroom for 25.5 persons in the 6-11 age group. The population threshold in the 6-11 age group requiring a 30-classroom primary school which operates 30 whole-day classes is hence 765 persons; that for a 24-classroom primary school is 612 persons; and that for a 18-classroom primary school is 459 persons. This provision standard has allowed for the implementation of small-class teaching in Primary One in suitable public primary schools starting from the 2009/10 school year, and for extension by phases to all classes from Primary One to Primary Six by the 2014/15 school year.

  Site Reservation

2.2.9 Reservation of sites for primary schools should be made on a district basis.  For primary school planning purpose, the whole Territory is divided into 18 districts, which are identical to the administrative districts of the 18 District Councils.

2.2.10 District planners should work with the Secretary for Education to ensure that a sufficient number of sites are available to meet the demand within each district. An additional reserve equivalent to 10% of the number of sites required for primary schools as calculated on the above standards should be set aside in each new development area so as to provide for flexible planning.  If specific demographic projections are prepared for these areas, the 10% additional reservation can be applied with flexibility.

2.2.11 At the same time, other factors such as population characteristics, site area and environmental and traffic requirements should also be considered in planning the provision of primary schools in a district. For instance, in the Islands District where inter-island travelling should be minimised as far as possible, additional school sites should be reserved at the request of the Secretary for Education.

  Comprehensive Housing Projects

2.2.12 Comprehensively planned and designed housing projects, public or private, should, as a matter of principle, be self-supporting in the provision of primary school places.  The provision of adequate primary school places within comprehensive housing developments would have the merit of minimising the travelling time required of students residing in the estates.

2.2.13 For housing estates developed or redeveloped by the Housing Authority, adequate site or sites for primary schools should be provided to cater for the developments' own design population unless there is a surplus of places or school reservations elsewhere in the district.  For example, if an estate has a design population that would generate a demand for an 18-classroom primary school, then a large enough site within the boundary of the estate to accommodate the required primary school should be provided.  If the district has a surplus of school places, and sufficient site reservations already exist, then it may not be necessary to reserve any further primary school in the development.

2.2.14 For private comprehensive residential developments, including the Housing Society's estates, every opportunity should be secured in processing the development/re-development schemes to require the provision of adequate primary schools to meet the developments' own design population.  Where a site, or sites, for primary schools are reserved, the Secretary for Education should be consulted as to whether the private developer should also be entrusted with the building of the school building(s) to his satisfaction.  Relevant departments and bureaux should be consulted on whether the cost of school project(s) should be borne by the private developer or to be reimbursed by the Government in accordance with the prevailing policy.

  Secondary Schools

Secondary School Design

2.2.15 For planning purpose, and as a general reference to facilitate the identification and reservation of sites for secondary schools, the Architectural Services Department has prepared an indicative-design for a secondary school consisting of 30-classrooms. Figure 4 shows the general block layout plan for this school design. According to the general block layout plan, a reference site area of 6 950m2 with a minimum acceptable width of 65m is required to accommodate a secondary school.

2.2.16 As far as possible, the site reserved should have adequate area and suitably configured to accommodate the school building and the necessary supporting facilities.

2.2.17 However, the Secretary for Education is prepared to consider secondary school sites with size and/or configuration not meeting the reference requirements stipulated in para. 2.2.15 for individual cases.  When such sites are identified, advice should be sought from the Secretary for Education.  Innovations and greater flexibility in school design will also be considered on a case-by-case basis, subject to the arrangements agreed within the Administration on the adoption of flexible design for school building.

  Provision standard

2.2.18 The provision of secondary schools should be based on a standard of one whole day classroom for 40 persons in the 12-17 age group. With a 30-classroom school which operates 30 whole day classes, it is necessary to provide one school for every 1 200 persons in the 12-17 age group.  The provision has taken into account the demand for senior secondary school places.

  Site Reservation

2.2.19 Site reservation for secondary schools should also be made on a district basis such that a sufficient number of sites are available to meet the district demand.  The overall provision of secondary schools, however, is assessed on a territorial basis to ensure that the overall provision would not exceed the territorial requirement, subject to paragraph 2.2.20 below.

2.2.20 Reservation of new school sites, including those for reprovisioning purpose, should be made with due regard to the regional needs to reduce the imbalance of secondary school provision between the urban areas and the New Territories.

  Methodology for Assessing School Provision

2.2.21 The projected population in the relevant school-age groups, namely 3-5 for kindergarten, 6-11 for primary and 12-17 for secondary, forms the basis for assessing the number of classrooms and schools required in each district.  The different population thresholds for the respective school-age groups as stated in paras. 2.2.1, 2.2.8 and 2.2.18 can be used to work out the number of classrooms and schools required.

2.2.22 District planners should refer to the more specific district-based age distribution forecasts prepared by the Working Group on Population Distribution Projections (WGPD) when assessing the school requirements.

2.2.23 In cases where only the projected total population for the district is available such as in new development areas, the territory-wide average percentage age distribution for the relevant school-age group, given in Table 1 below, can be used in working out the size of the relevant school-age population.

Table 1 : Projected Percentage Age Distribution for Selected School-Age Group 

[ Simple Table Format ]

  Year School-Age Group
3-5
(%)
6-11
(%)
12-17
(%)
2011 2.27 4.48 6.62
2012 2.35 4.42 6.29
2013 2.42 4.35 5.97
2014 2.42 4.52 5.54
2015 2.45 4.68 5.18
2016 2.50 4.88 4.89
2017 2.49 5.13 4.71
2018 2.47 5.28 4.69
2019 2.47 5.41 4.65
2020 2.47 5.46 4.82
2021 2.46 5.49 4.99

Source : Hong Kong Population Projections 2010 to 2039 prepared by C&SD.

2.2.24 When assessing school provision, district planners should consult the Secretary for Education for the latest forecast demand on school provision and consult the Commissioner for Census and Statistics for the latest population projections.

  Shared Use of School and Community Facilities

  Clustering of Schools

2.2.25 To facilitate the implementation of the through-train mode and to utilise land and other resources more efficiently, primary and secondary schools should be planned, where feasible, in either pairs or in clusters so that the school facilities can be shared, or the sites can be developed jointly as a school village.  The opportunity for clustering and the types of facilities to be shared should however be determined on a case-by-case basis.

  Shared Use of Facilities with the Community

2.2.26 In view of the shortage of school sites, in particular in the urban areas, consideration will be given for schools to share the use of adjacent community and recreation facilities.  Where appropriate, school facilities should also be shared for use by the community.  Shared use of facilities among schools and the community should be considered and planned on a case-by-case basis in consultation with concerned bureaux and departments. The proposed joint use should however be compatible with the function of the school.

  Facilities for Technical Education and Vocational Training

2.2.27 There are no fixed standards of provision for technical education and vocational training facilities as the demand for such education and training relates to the changing needs of the industries and economy. The numbers and types of places are jointly assessed by the Government and Vocational Training Council.

2.2.28 Requirement of these facilities needs to be determined on a territory-wide basis and it is desirable to ensure that sufficient sites are reserved for them.  In the preparation of town plans, district planners should consult the Secretary for Education on the reservation of sites for these facilities.

2.2.29 The site area requirement and design layout for such facilities will be determined on a case-by-case basis.

2.2.30 Secondary technical and pre-vocational schools are within the scope of technical education.  However, their provision standards fall within the secondary school category which have been incorporated in paras. 2.2.18 and 2.2.21 to 2.2.24 above.

  Special Schools

2.2.31 These schools will be provided to meet territory-wide requirements rather than specific local needs. The location of new schools should be as widespread as possible to cater for the various types of handicapped. The views of the Secretary for Education should be sought on the need and site reservation for various types of special schools.

  Post-secondary Colleges

2.2.32 Requirements for post-secondary colleges need to be determined on a territory-wide basis in the light of long-term education policies, demographic changes and manpower demand.  It is desirable to ensure that sufficient sites are reserved for them, and reservation of sites should be made by district planners in consultation with the Secretary for Education.

2.2.33 The site area requirement and design layout for such facilities will be determined on a case-by-case basis in consultation with the Secretary for Education. As a general guide, it is proposed that sites reserved should have a size between 2 000m2 to 7 000m2, and should be suitably configured to accommodate the college buildings and the necessary supporting facilities such as ball courts and carparks. Total gross floor area should approximately be in a range from 6 500m2 to 22 000m2.

2.2.34 Depending on size of operation, post-secondary colleges can either be free-standing on ground level or part of a composite structure. The location of post-secondary colleges should be easily accessible by public transport.

  Universities

2.2.35 These include institutions funded by the University Grants Committee.  Requirements for these facilities need to be determined on a territory-wide basis in the light of long-term education policies, demographic changes and manpower demand.

2.3 Locational Guidelines

2.3.1 The environmental guidelines as set out in Chapter 9 of the HKPSG on 'Environment' should be applied in deciding on the location of school buildings.  As a general principle, schools should not be located close to sources of air pollution or potentially hazardous installations or within the consultation zone of landfills.

2.3.2 Schools should be sited away from areas affected by significant noise. If this is unavoidable, appropriate abatement measures should be considered in consultation with the Director of Environmental Protection and the Secretary for Education.

2.3.3 All schools should be provided with emergency vehicular access to the satisfaction of the Director of Fire Services.  They should be safe from the danger of falling objects from neighbouring buildings.

2.3.4 As a general rule, schools should be free-standing on ground level.  However, the Secretary for Education is prepared to consider, on a case-by-case basis, schools on podium provided that they are free-standing and meet other locational requirements.

2.3.5 As far as circumstances permit, schools should be located in proximity to public open space and compatible institutions/community facilities such as public libraries, community centres and indoor recreation centres but excluding open sports grounds/stadium.

2.3.6 Schools should be so located and distributed so that any ingress/egress movements and loading and unloading activities would minimise local traffic congestion.

2.3.7 Kindergartens should preferably be located within 0.4km measured radially from residential areas.  On their way to school, kindergarten pupils should not be expected to cross any major roads which are not served by grade-separated or traffic light controlled pedestrian crossings.

2.3.8 Technical institutes and industrial training centres should preferably be located near industrial areas.

2.3.9 Whenever possible, the school building should be located in a site which enables the classroom block to have its longest axis orientated east-west so as to minimise the effects of the sun. The open play area and the ball courts of the school shall best be located adjacent to the school building proper.


3. Medical and Health Facilities

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3.1 Regional Approach

3.1.1 The 1974 White Paper recommended a regional approach in planning and administration of medical and health services.  Under the system, hospitals and clinic facilities in a common geographical area were grouped together to form an integrated service network.  The aim is to ensure a more even use of Government and Government-assisted hospital beds and that patients are treated with the level of staff and facilities most appropriate to their clinical conditions.

3.1.2 Since the formation of the Hospital Authority on 1.12.90, all Government and Government‑assisted hospitals have been retitled as public hospitals under the control of the Hospital Authority.  The delivery of quality patient care in acute and extended care institutions has been facilitated by the establishment of 8 functional general hospital clusters, the objective of which is to ensure continuity and service coverage for the whole episode of illness.  Mental health services have also been re‑organised under the same concept.

3.1.3 The delivery system under the Hospital Authority divides public hospitals into 8 general hospital clusters, namely, Hong Kong West, Hong Kong East, Kowloon Central, Kowloon West, Kowloon East, New Territories South, New Territories East and New Territories North.  For the territory as a whole, each cluster will provide appropriate acute and extended care services to ensure a continuum of care throughout the patient's episode of illness, from the acute phase to the convalescent and rehabilitation, and extending to the community after‑care phases.  These hospital clusters will form the framework for the establishment of collaborative networks, with other health care providers and welfare and community organisation.

3.2 Hospital

3.2.1 For long-term planning purpose, the aim is to provide 5.5 beds (including all types of hospital beds both in public and private sectors) per 1 000 persons. This ratio, arrived at by application of a "bed formula", was endorsed by the then Medical Development Advisory Committee. The planning and development of hospitals need to be determined within a regional context, taking into consideration the likely future concentrations of population and the need for different types of hospital beds (i.e. acute general, extended care or psychiatric beds).

3.2.2 For site reservation purpose, a standard of 80m2 per bed should be adopted for hospitals.  This includes requirements for other supporting services and associated ancillary facilities such as car parking, loading and unloading areas. It also provides scope for expansion. In the case of a extended care hospital, a standard of 60m2 per bed should be used.

3.2.3 Provision of hospital service in different regions are pursued by the Hospital Authority in liaison with the Planning Department.

3.3 Specialist Clinics/Polyclinics

3.3.1 There should be a specialist clinic/polyclinic whenever a hospital is built to offer the necessary support.

3.3.2 One main function of specialist clinic/polyclinic is to supplement hospital services with specialities and other specialist treatment centres including laboratories, radiology and expanded provision for medical rehabilitation. Where specific site reservation has to be made, about 4 712m2 (62m x 76m) should be provided. Site reservations should take into account local development constraints, if any, and the planning should allow scope for expansion of the ambulatory care and out-patient services.

3.3.3 The provision of specialist clinic/polyclinic service in different regions should be pursued by the Hospital Authority in liaison with the Planning Department.

3.4 General Clinics/Health Centres

3.4.1 For future planning purpose, the aim should be to provide one clinic/health centre for every 100 000 persons. This ratio is to be applied with flexibility to meet different district needs of a region.

3.4.2 The provision of general clinic/health centre service is to be considered in a district context to provide primary health care services including general out-patient service and family health service. Where specific site reservation has to be made, about 2 220m2 (37m x 60m) should be provided.

3.4.3 For the provision of rural clinics, each case should be considered on its own merits.

3.4.4 The provision of general clinic/health centre service in different districts should be pursued by the Department of Health in liaison with the Planning Department.

3.5 Location Factors

3.5.1 Good accessibility and a reasonably central location to the area served are the principal factors to be taken into account in the reservation of sites for public and extended care hospitals and clinics.

3.5.2 Hospitals should preferably be sited in elevated positions to take advantage of scenic views and more equable environmental conditions. They should also be so located as to be insulated from noise and fumes from major road and industrial uses. Specialist clinics should be located adjacent to public hospitals to facilitate inter‑dependent support.

3.5.3 General clinics should be centrally located within the districts they are intended to serve. They should be easily accessible by public transport and, where possible, be sited in association with other community facilities to which residents require daily access.


4. Police Stations

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4.1 Standards

4.1.1 The following standards should be used as a general guide :

Table 2 : Standards for Police Stations

[ Table Summary ]

Facility Standards Site Requirement
District Police Stations One for every
200 000 - 500 000 persons.
About 4 650m2 (61m x 76m) fronting onto at least 2 main roads plus a further allocation of similar size for rank and file married quarters.
Divisional Police Stations One for every
100 000 - 200 000 persons.
About 3 000m2 (50m x 60m) fronting onto at least 2 main roads
Sub-Divisional Police Stations/Police Posts No specific standard. Required in rural districts, low-density residential areas and along the frontier. Site allocation dependent on building design.
Marine Police Stations No specific standard. Site allocation dependent on building design.

 

4.1.2 No hard and fast rules can be laid down as to when district and divisional stations may be needed within the limits of the prescribed standards as much depends on local factors such as:

(a) the types of functions in the area, e.g. commercial, industrial, high density residential, agricultural, marine, etc.;

(b) the characteristics of the population in the area, e.g. squatters, resettlement families, white collar, middle income, etc.;

(c) the incidence of crime and other problems which generate the need for a police presence and service; and

(d) the presence of vital security points and sensitive premises.

4.1.3 The need for marine police stations will be governed by such variable factors as :

(a) the amount and distribution of shipping in the ports;

(b) the location and nature of cargo handling facilities;

(c) the size and distribution of the territory fishing fleet;

(d) the location and development of new harbour installations; and

(e) the incidence of illegal entries by sea.

4.2 Locational Factors

4.2.1 In general terms, police stations should be so located to afford good access to members of the public without jeopardizing security.


5. Magistracies

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5.1 Standards

5.1.1 The standards for the provision of magistracies should be one 8-courtroom magistracy for a population up to 660 000 persons. This is however to be applied with flexibility to meet the updated policy objectives of the Judiciary and the district needs of a region.

5.1.2 The need to provide for magistracies in single-user buildings is a matter which should be confirmed with the Judiciary Administrator and the Government Property Administrator.  For a standard 8-courtroom magistracy, a site reservation of about 4 200m2 (61m x 69m) should normally be allowed for.  However, where possible, the site dimension for single-user buildings should be applied with flexibility to ensure optimum site utilization.

5.2 Locational Factors

5.2.1 In view of the considerable day-to-day use that is made of magistracies, it is important that they should be in a readily accessible central location on or close to main public transportation routes. Where possible, they should be sited in close association with other main Government offices. Adequate on-site loading/unloading and parking facilities should be provided, subject to the advice of the Transport Department.


6. Correctional Facilities

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6.1 Standards

6.1.1 Correctional facilities include minimum, medium and maximum correctional institutions, drug addiction treatment centres, psychiatric centres, rehabilitation centres, training centres and half-way houses. The scale of provision required for each facility needs to be determined on a long term basis in the light of detailed studies of historical trends, social changes, rehabilitation needs and projections of those components which are likely to influence the nature of crimes and conviction and recidivism rates, e.g. changing age structure of the population, economic conditions, new laws, sentence patterns and police detection rates etc.

6.1.2 Modern prison designs have sought to restrict and control the movement of inmates throughout the facility while permitting a maximal degree of direct monitoring by correctional staff.

6.1.3 In designing the physical aspects of security, a balance should be struck between the best way of achieving the required security level and the need to respect the dignity of the individual. For example, it is possible to use architectural designs to secure cell and dormitory while meeting the requirements for access to natural light and fresh air at the same time.

6.2 Locational Factors

6.2.1 Sites for correctional facilities should be located in areas that are reasonably well insulated from main urban areas but at the same time should be served with good communications so as to make it relatively accessible to encourage relatives to visit the inmates.

6.2.2 For mutual security purposes correctional facilities should be located so as to have good inter-institutional accessibility.

6.2.3 The configuration of sites should have enough platform areas to enable the provision of outdoor recreational fields and away from slopes and the terraced site forms.

6.2.4 The location should also offer a reasonable aspect having regard to any possible adverse effects a correctional facility might have on the amenity and development of adjoining areas.


7. Fire Service Facilities

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7.1 Standards

7.1.1 On the basis of the Policy on Fire Fighting endorsed by Executive Council in April 1977, it is recommended that the provision and siting of fire stations within urban and rural areas should be based on a graded response time determined by a fire risk category system. The response time is the period of time between the time of the fire call received by the Fire Services Communication Centre and the time of the arrival of the Fire Services resources at the scene of the fire.

7.1.2 The level of initial attendance to a fire is to be determined by the fire risk category of the area in which the fire occurs except where special circumstances warrant a higher level of response.

7.1.3 All future fire stations should be classified and provided with sites as follows :

(a) Standard Divisional Fire Stations

One such station is required for each division.  A divisional fire station will house a number one alarm attendance plus fire appliances and resources on command and divisional allocation. A minimum site allocation of 2 960m2 (47m minimum frontage) should be made.

(b) Standard Sub-divisional Fire Stations

These will house a number one alarm attendance plus such fire appliance and resources as local conditions require. A minimum site allocation of 1 800m2 (37m minimum frontage) should be made.

(c) The frontage of the site in each case will have to be widened accordingly if the run-in to the drill yard is not from the back.  However, the site area will remain the same.

(d) When a standard divisional fire station and ambulance depot are erected on a joint site, a minimum site allocation of 3 830m2, with a minimum frontage of 80m and a drill yard of 1 635m2 behind the divisional fire station building block, should be made.

(e) When a standard sub‑divisional fire station and ambulance depot are erected on a joint site, a minimum site allocation of 2 670m2, with a minimum frontage of 70m and a drill yard of 1 225m2 behind the sub‑divisional fire station building block, should be made.

(f) Non-standard fire stations may be required at certain locations to meet local needs.

7.1.4 Fire stations may be accommodated on joint sites with ambulance depots, wherever practicable.

7.1.5 Fire stations may be located on the ground and lower levels of a building with other forms of government development above, provided that the fire stations are completely segregated from such other uses. Separate access on the ground floor should be provided and the windows of the other development overlooking the drill yard should be kept to the minimum number in order to maintain security and privacy. Furthermore, such other uses should have a compatible nature with the fire stations. The compatibility of the intended government uses with the fire stations and the feasibility of having such combined development should be judged on individual merit and subject to agreement of the Fire Services Department.

7.2 Locational Factors

7.2.1 Fire stations should be located with ready access onto both ways of primary or district distributor roads. Regard should also be made to the traffic circulation pattern and interchanges.


8. Ambulance Service Facilities

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8.1 Standards

8.1.1 According to the Ambulance Programme Plan, the number of ambulances required will be calculated according to the projected population distribution and the projected incidence rate which will determine the number of emergency and removal calls, taking also into account the provision of further social welfare services by Government, particularly in respect of hospitalization and associated activities in specialized clinics.

8.1.2 For all future ambulance depots, the standard sub-divisional fire station design is adopted, except that there is no drill tower. A minimum site allocation of 1 160m2 (36m frontage) should be made.

8.1.3 The frontage of the site will have to be widened accordingly if the run-in to the drill yard is not from the back. However, the site area will remain the same.

8.1.4 When a standard ambulance depot and divisional fire station are to be erected on a joint site, a minimum site allocation of 3 830m2, with a minimum frontage of 80m and a drill yard of 1 635m2 behind the divisional fire station building block, should be made.

8.1.5 When a standard ambulance depot and sub-divisional fire station are to be erected on a joint site, a minimum site allocation of 2 670m2, with a minimum frontage of 70m and a drill yard of 1 225m2 behind the sub-divisional fire station building block, should be made.

8.1.6 Ambulance stations are non-standard provisions based on local needs.

8.1.7 Ambulance depots/stations may be accommodated on joint sites with fire stations, wherever practicable.

8.1.8 Ambulance depots/stations may be located on the ground and lower levels of a building with other forms of government development above, provided that the ambulance depots/stations are completely segregated from such other uses. Separate access on the ground floor should be provided and the windows of the other development overlooking the service yard of the ambulance depots/stations should be kept to the minimum number in order to maintain security and privacy. Furthermore, such other uses should have a compatible nature with the ambulance depots/stations. The compatibility of the intended government uses with the ambulance depots/stations and the feasibility of having such combined development should be judged on individual merit and subject to agreement of the Fire Services Department.

8.2 Locational Factors

8.2.1 Ambulance depots and stations should be so sited as to afford ambulances to give an emergency coverage within 10 minutes and 20 minutes in urban/new town and rural areas respectively, and should be located in convenient proximity to:

(a) major government and private hospitals which generate a large number of non-emergency removals;

(b) known areas in which a high number of emergency calls originate; and

(c) government and private clinics including physiotherapy establishments and similar facilities.

8.2.2 Ambulance depots and stations should also be located with ready access onto both ways of primary or district distributor roads. Regard should also be made to the traffic circulation system and interchanges.


9. Arts Venues

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9.1 Definition

9.1.1 Arts venues in the context of this section refer to the physical accommodation for the undertaking of arts activities of different types, nature and forms. They include venues for dance, drama, film and media arts, music, performances and visual arts but exclude commercial-oriented and profit making entertainment venues such as cinema and disco. Arts facilities may be in the following, but not necessarily exhaustive, forms: theatres, coliseums, studios, exhibition halls, function rooms and offices for production and promotion of arts activities. Museums and libraries, except arts related, are not included.

9.2 Assessment of Need

9.2.1 The provision of arts venues should be determined on the basis of need, as assessed and advised by the Secretary for Home Affairs. When determining need, the following should be taken into consideration:

(a) existing provision of similar and related arts venues, by the public and private sectors, and the level of their usage; the provision of new arts facilities should be carefully evaluated to ensure that it would be complementary with the existing provision in the neighbourhood;

(b) arts and other relevant policies influencing the need for arts venues;

(c) development plans and programmes of new arts venues of the arts organisations and other facility providers; and

(d) views of community groups, arts community and facility providers.

9.3 A Framework for Provision

9.3.1 The planning of arts venues should be based on two broad levels of need:

(a) Territory-wide Needs: essentially the arts needs of all Hong Kong residents, visitors, elite professional and other artists and performing companies serving the territory as a whole. These venues should preferably be at prominent location easily accessible by public transport and in reasonable commuting distance of the urban resident and visitor population. The provision of high quality venues is normally required to encourage the development of Hong Kong's professional arts community. Examples of such territory-wide facilities are the Hong Kong Cultural Centre, City Hall, and the Hong Kong Academy for the Performing Arts.

(b) Community Needs: essentially the arts needs at the community level of residents, schools, community groups, local performing groups, voluntary associations and other special interest groups and societies. Such needs require accessibility to the residential districts they are intended to serve. Examples of arts venues serving community needs are town halls and civic centres.

9.4 Locational and Area Planning Guidelines

  Accessibility

9.4.1 Accessibility is a key criterion in the selection of locations for arts venues as it directly influences the level of participation by artists and audiences.

9.4.2 Arts venues at the territory-wide level will serve the needs of both residents and visitors. They should be located at a prominent location in the heart of the city or within reasonable commuting distance from the city and be easily accessible by public transport by both residents and visitors. Venues catering for high proportions of overseas patrons should be located in close proximity to major hotels, tourist attractions and main shopping areas.

9.4.3 Arts venues at the community level will primarily serve the needs of local residents. In deciding the location of such venues, it is essential to consider the proximity to workplaces and residential districts to encourage community participation. In particular, facilities for arts education should be located within walking distance from schools and community facilities.

  Environmental Considerations

9.4.4 In the selection of location for arts venues, environmental guidelines as stipulated in HKPSG Chapter 9 should be followed. The quality of the neighbouring environment and the extent to which the arts venues are buffered from roads and other noxious and possibly incompatible uses such as refuse collection points and markets, should be considered. Setbacks from nearby roads and the use of landscaped open space as buffers can address environmental concerns. In the selection of location for open area venues, possible noise impact affecting surrounding sensitive receivers should be avoided.

  Agglomeration of Facilities

9.4.5 The selection of location for new arts venues should give due consideration to the importance of agglomeration of arts facilities. This can take two forms, namely:

(a) horizontal integration ('arts district' concept) - to encourage the provision of different types of arts facilities with a similar role and supporting facilities such as carparks, restaurants and shops, in close proximity; and

(b) vertical integration ('arts centre' concept) - to encourage the provision of different types of facilities for one or a few related artforms at one location such as a dance centre with venues for performance, rehearsal, training and research etc. all under one roof.

  Arts Districts

9.4.6 In order to provide the horizontal integration of arts and supporting facilities, development plan preparation should identify and comprehensively plan new arts districts and arts renewal areas. Areas should be chosen:

(a) to include a wide variety of formal and informal facilities for arts, culture and entertainment within walking distance in one district;

(b) to encourage the use of a wide range of non-dedicated buildings to provide a variety of different types of arts activities; and

(c) to form a basis for marketing the area as an arts, cultural and entertainment venue so as to add value to those facilities and related commercial facilities.

9.4.7 The comprehensive planning principles to be adopted in these areas will include:

(a) achieving a critical mass of arts, cultural and entertainment facilities supported by mixed commercial, hotel and residential uses;

(b) developing landmark buildings as focal points and the spaces round them as backdrop for continuation of the arts activities from an internal and formal environment to an external and informal environment;

(c) providing complementary private and public developments including themed dining and retailing, cinemas, museums and galleries, arts village, arts market areas, parks and open space with public exhibits integrated into these developments;

(d) encouraging new small scale arts, cultural and entertainment facilities support by mixed commercial and residential uses;

(e) preserving as a totality the local characters of the existing areas with special cultural/heritage values including small-scale and localized features/buildings that could reflect the arts culture;

(f) identifying and reusing available publicly owned buildings and heritage buildings in these areas for arts activities;

(g) promoting pedestrianisation and streetscape for street and public open area performance through proper design of the pedestrian and public areas;

(h) integrating and linking existing and established areas with special characters and concentration of arts activities with new arts districts through direct pedestrian/transport connections;

(i) installing signage to guide visitors to various arts venues and facilities; and

(j) establishing direct pedestrian connections to MTR and KCR stations, ferries and transport interchange etc.

9.5 Traffic and Transport Guidelines

  Public Transport

9.5.1 Access to public transport facilities is a key consideration in the planning and development of arts venues. Where possible, art venues should be located in close proximity to public transportation routes and termini. The difference of accessibility needs between local residents and overseas visitors, as the two main groups of patrons, should also be acknowledged:

(a) local residents - this group needs access to arts venues at both territory-wide and community levels. Access through a wide range of public transport modes is necessary, including rail, bus, mini-bus, taxi; and

(b) visitors to Hong Kong - visitors usually attend larger-scale urban facilities primarily in the city centre. Compared with local residents, taxi and rail are the modes of public transport more frequently used by visitors to Hong Kong.

  Loading/Unloading Facilities

9.5.2 In the planning of arts venues, the need to provide adequate loading and unloading facilities for the transportation of props, sets and exhibits should be considered. Arts venues require adequate and efficient loading/unloading facilities, the provision level of which would depend on the scale and nature of the arts activities at the venue.

9.5.3 Sufficient space, including adequate turning circles, should be provided for the temporary parking of goods vehicles. Adequate container lifts and handling facilities for large-size objects should also be provided to aid loading and unloading.

  Parking Facilities

9.5.4 Adequate parking for goods vehicles and private cars should be provided in very close proximity to the art venue itself, or preferably on-site. The needs for parking facilities would depend on the scale of performances, exhibitions and other arts activities at the venue, the number of patrons, performers and facility staff involved and the accessibility to public transport provision.

9.6 General Design Guidelines

  Venues at Territory-wide Level

9.6.1 Major arts venues, in particular for provision at the territory-wide level, should adopt a distinctive external design of landmark quality.

9.6.2 The design of major arts venues should be carried out to ensure external and internal design is fully compatible. Specialist designers should be employed and specialised facilities should be provided in order to adequately cater for the functional requirements while achieving a high quality of aesthetic design. Relevant Government departments should be consulted on planning, building and safety standards.

  Venues at Community Level

9.6.3 While distinctive and high quality design is desirable, spacious accommodation, flexibility in usage, low cost to users and effective and sympathetic management style are equally if not more important.

  Special Needs for the Disabled and the Elderly

9.6.4 Arts venues should cater for the special needs of the disabled and elderly participants and patrons. Ramps with handrails leading to the stages, seats and other facilities, disabled toilets, carparks reserved for use by the disabled and other supporting facilities should be provided. 

9.7 Provision of Service/Ancillary Facilities

9.7.1 The schedule of accommodation for venues for performance and exhibition should include complementary facilities for office for production and promotion, rehearsal, practice and workshop etc. Where appropriate, training venues to help nurture and cultivate the arts talents for the young generation and the community should be provided.

9.7.2 Sufficient facilities for storage and possibly the buildings of sets and props should be provided on the same basis, depending on the scale and nature of the arts activities the venues are designed for.

9.7.3 The provision of catering and retail outlets and entertainment facilities for the patrons should be considered.

9.8 The Use of Non-Dedicated Facilities for Arts Activities

9.8.1 The use of non-dedicated facilities for arts activities, either temporarily or on a permanent basis, should be encouraged, taking into consideration building and safety standards and land use compatibility.

  Residential Developments

9.8.2 In the planning of public and private housing estates, provision of facilities for arts activities such as performances, exhibitions, rehearsals, workshops and training classes should be considered and provided where practicable.

  Industrial Developments

9.8.3 Proposals for use of existing industrial premises in areas where there are no major environmental interface problems for appropriate arts activities (e.g. ceramic and sculpture workshops) should be sympathetically considered.

  Commercial Developments

9.8.4 In the planning of commercial premises, including exhibition centres, retail centres, office buildings and hotels, provision of facilities for arts activities such as performances and exhibitions should be encouraged.

  Public Buildings

9.8.5 Government departments and public agencies such as Lands Department, Government Property Agency, and Urban Renewal Authority, should consider allowing the temporary or permanent use of available premises under their management for arts activities such as arts studios, workshops and rehearsal venues. These include under-utilised community halls, or the temporary use of school premises.

  Heritage Buildings

9.8.6 Conversion of heritage buildings and other public buildings of special character, for arts activities congruent with the character of the buildings should be promoted e.g. folklore performance in a historical building.

  Temporary Use of Common Spaces Within/Between Buildings

9.8.7 The flexible use of large common circulation spaces, such as lobbies and foyers etc., within or between public and private buildings, for arts activities on a temporary basis should be encouraged.

  Public Outdoor Spaces

9.8.8 In the planning of public outdoor spaces such as major open space, sports ground, waterfront promenades, pedestrian streets and open squares, the provision of space for incidental outdoor arts activities, such as performances and exhibitions, should also be encouraged, subject to no adverse noise and traffic impacts.


10. Community Halls and Social Welfare Facilities

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10.1 Community Halls

  Background

10.1.1 Community halls have mainly been planned and provided as a part of community centres, each of which consists of a community hall for community activities and a separate welfare block with a fixed floor area for welfare services. Consequent to a review of the provision of accommodation for welfare services, it is considered more appropriate for the extent of floor area required for welfare services to be assessed and determined on a project by project basis. Therefore, the previous planning standards and guidelines for the provision of community centres are no longer valid. There is a need to promulgate a new set of planning standards and guidelines for the provision of community halls.

10.1.2 Whilst in future community halls will no longer be co-located with welfare services in every case, there are clear advantages for including welfare services in the development of community halls, as the clients of welfare services are one of the main users of community halls. Hence, the Director of Social Welfare (responsible for welfare facilities and Group Work Units) should be consulted, early at the project planning stage of the community halls, on the extent of welfare accommodation required for joint development with the community halls.

  Responsibility for Community Halls

10.1.3 The Director of Home Affairs is responsible for the provision and management of community halls and, hence, should be consulted on all community hall proposals. The Government Property Administrator, who is tasked with ensuring optimum utilisation of sites, should also be consulted at an early stage of the planning process. Arrangements may sometimes be made for other Government departments e.g. Housing Department, to provide and/or manage community halls on behalf of the Home Affairs Department. In such cases, the client departments should also be consulted early in the planning process.

  Functions of Community Halls

10.1.4 Community halls provide a focal point for local community activities undertaken by all age groups, including such activities as meetings of local community organisations; social group and civic education activities; training courses; and celebration, recreation and sport activities. They also provide temporary sheltering for people in need during natural disasters, emergency situations and inclement weather.

  Provision of Community Halls

10.1.5 Community halls are provided on the basis of need, as assessed and advised by the Director of Home Affairs who will take into account the views of local community. The views of the respective District Officers should hence be sought on the need for the provision of community halls when development plans (including outline development plans, layout plans and planning briefs for comprehensive development/redevelopment) are prepared. The respective District Officers and the Government Property Administrator should also be consulted on the continued need for sites reserved on current development plans for community centres/halls.

10.1.6 When determining need, the following factors should be taken into consideration: 

(a) population size; 

(b) area characteristics and community aspirations;

(c) location of the area concerned;

(d) availability of existing community halls or similar facilities nearby;

(e) the usage rates of nearby community halls;

(f) accessibility of nearby community halls to subject area; and

(g) availability of alternative accommodations for community activities and their ease of access.

10.1.7 Where the need for a community hall is discerned, but is not up to a level as to justify a 'full-size standard-designed' facility, or a planned community hall cannot be provided in time to meet community needs, alternative accommodations for community activities should be considered. This could include specially-designed multi-purpose function rooms and selected school halls.

  Floor Area/Site Requirements

10.1.8 Community halls should, as far as possible, be planned and provided as a part of integrated GIC developments in the form of joint-users buildings, or as an integral part of comprehensive developments where no suitable GIC sites are available. The Government Property Administrator is responsible for co-ordinating joint user requirements and taking the integrated development project forward in the Capital Works Programme. When it is not possible to develop integrated GIC cum community hall buildings due to such problems as the timing and priority of resources for individual GIC components, stand-alone community halls may be constructed subject to the agreement of the Property Strategy Group.

10.1.9 It should, however, be noted that as advised by the Government Property Administrator, stand-alone community halls would only be approved in exceptional circumstances. Every effort should hence be made to identify joint-users for an integrated development and to resolve associated implementation issues.

10.1.10 A standard-designed community hall requires about 1 260m2 of gross floor area (32m x 39.5m) and should include a multi-purpose hall for 450 persons, a stage, a stage store, male and female dressing rooms and a meeting room. If not provided elsewhere, an ancillary management office, a store room and a conference room as well as toilets should be provided.

10.1.11 Where a full-size standard-designed community hall is not required, specially-designed multi-purpose function rooms for community activities should be considered.

10.1.12 Due to the relatively large floor area required for a community hall, should there be the need it may be appropriate to reserve sites for the joint-users buildings by using community halls as the basic component, and then add on other GIC uses. The respective District Planning Officers, having regard to such factors as size of site available, types of GIC facilities, location, ease of access to population being served etc., and in consultation with concerned departments, in particular Government Property Agency, should work out the facilities to be accommodated in the joint-users buildings and the respective floor area requirements for the facilities.

  Locational Factors

10.1.13 To facilitate maximum utilization, community halls should be centrally located and be easily accessible to the population they are intended to serve. Other GIC facilities to be co-located with community halls should preferably be used by the public on a day-to-day basis such as government offices, welfare facilities, clinics, etc.

10.2 Social Welfare Facilities

  Introduction

10.2.1 The Social Welfare Department provides a wide range of facilities for different sectors of the community including children and youth, the elderly and the disabled etc. Some of the facilities are provided in the welfare block of community centres, while others are accommodated in public housing estates, private developments and joint-user buildings. Listed below are facilities which are planned based on a number of factors such as population, demographic characteristics, geographical factor, service provision and service demand, etc and are widely distributed throughout the territory.

10.2.2 For the purpose of assessing premises requirements for social welfare facilities, several terms are employed, including "net operational floor area" and "net usable floor area". The definition for these terms are given in Table 3.

  Child Care Centres

  The Standards

10.2.3 Child care centres provide care and training for children under 3 years old. In a child care centre, activities are organized for children with an aim to develop their social, physical and conceptual skills. These activities generally include gross motor play, fine motor play, creative arts and crafts, story telling, music, etc.

10.2.4 The provision will be based on the estimated demand, socio-economic factors, district characteristics and the provision of other child care support services for the area.

10.2.5 The net operational floor area of a 102 place child care centre is 443m2, including toilets for children, but excluding staff toilets, partitions and circulation area. In addition, an outdoor playground for the exclusive use of the child care centre is preferred.

  Locational Factors

10.2.6  A child care centre should be centrally located within a residential area and easily accessible to the population it intends to serve. The range of child care activities could be improved if it is located near a children's playground or public park. Due regard must be given to the health and safety aspects of the premises, in particular the safe escape of the occupants in the event of fire as stipulated in the Child Care Services Ordinance & Regulations and the Operation Manual for Pre-primary Institutions issued jointly by the Social Welfare Department and the Education Bureau. The Director of Fire Services must be consulted on the potential fire hazard of any adjacent development. It should take into account the compatibility of surrounding uses and be located away from uses which would have excessive noise, fumes and smells such as public transport terminus and refuse collection point.

10.2.7 According to the Child Care Services Regulations, child care centres must not be located higher than 12m above ground level for centres that serve children aged under 2 years or 24m above ground level for those that serve children aged 2 and above. For easy discharge of the young children to open area in case of fire, premises on lower floors such as ground floor or first floor are preferred. Upper floors with easy access to open or roof-top playground may also be considered.

10.2.8 According to Regulation 21 of the Child Care Services Regulations, all centre premises shall be adequately ventilated and lit. In addition, according to Regulation 32, every room used for toilet facilities must have window space equivalent to at least one tenth the size of its floor area.

  Integrated Children and Youth Services Centres

  The Standards

10.2.9 Integrated Children and Youth Services Centres (ICYSCs) are provided as part of the Government's welfare programme to encourage young people to involve themselves in worthwhile activities and interests. Each centre organizes a wide variety of indoor and outdoor activities designed to develop a young person's character and sense of social responsibility so that he or she may become a mature, responsible and contributing members of the community.

10.2.10 The standard of provision is one ICYSC for every 12 000 persons in the 6-24 age group. The standard is intended only as a general guide and should be applied flexibly having regard to local factors such as demographic characteristics, population concentration and geographical spread. Each ICYSC requires a net operational floor area of 631m2.

  Locational Factors

10.2.11 To help achieve maximum utilization, ICYSCs should be centrally located and easily accessible to the population they are intended to serve. Whenever possible, they should be sited in association with public recreation areas and other community facilities which are used on a day-to-day basis.

  Community Care and Support Facilities for Elders

10.2.12 Community care and support facilities for elders are targeted for elderly people aged 60 or above who are ageing in the community and are in need of care and support. As far as centre-based services are concerned, there are mainly two types of facilities, namely elderly centres [in the form of either district elderly community centres (DECCs), neighbourhood elderly centres (NECs) or social centres for the elderly (SEs)], and the day care centres/units for the elderly (DEs/DCUs).

  Elderly Centres

10.2.13 The existing fabric of elderly centres is the outcome of the Administration's response to the demand for new elderly centres over the years and the re-engineering of the community support services for the elders carried out since 2003 in which all the then multi-service centres for the elderly (MEs) and most of the SEs were upgraded into DECCs and NECs respectively. While some SEs may still co-exist with DECCs and NECs, there will not be any new provision of SEs.

  District Elderly Community Centres and Neighbourhood Elderly Centres

10.2.14 District Elderly Community Centres (DECCs) and Neighbourhood Elderly Centres (NECs) are centre-based community support facilities providing a range of services for elders at district/neighbourhood level to enable them to remain in the community and to lead a healthy, respectful and dignified life. At the district level, DECCs promote active ageing, and provide counselling, outreaching, and referral services as well as social and recreational activities. Also, they play a supporting role in the relevant sub-districts by co-ordinating with the NECs and other stakeholders to provide services to the elders through an integrated approach. At the neighbourhood level, NECs promote active ageing, and provide outreaching and referral services as well as social and recreational activities.

10.2.15 A DECC requires a net operational floor area (NOFA) of 424m2 while an NEC requires an NOFA of 303m2. These floor area requirements are for general reference only, and should be applied flexibly.

10.2.16 There should not be a pre-determined standard of provision of DECCs and NECs in a district. The number of DECCs and/or NECs in a district should be determined taking into account not only the size of the elderly population, but also the demographic characteristics, geographical factor and service demand, etc.

  Day Care Centres/Units for the Elderly

10.2.17 Day Care Centres/Units for the Elderly (DEs/DCUs) provide a range of centre-based care and support services during daytime to enable the frail and demented elders suffering from moderate or severe level of impairment to maintain their optimal level of functioning, develop their potential, improve their quality of life and continue living in their homes wherever feasible and possible. Besides, DEs/DCUs also provide support and assistance to the carers of the elderly.

10.2.18 A 40-place DE requires a NOFA of 267m2 while a 20-place DCU attached to a residential care home for the elderly (RCHE) or a DECC requires a NOFA of 70m2 and 80m2 respectively. These floor area requirements are for general reference only, and should be applied flexibly.

10.2.19 There should not be a pre-determined standard of provision of DEs/ DCUs in a district. The number of DEs/DCUs and the total number of day care places in a district should be determined taking into account not only the size of the elderly population, but also the demographic characteristics, geographical factor, existing service provision and service demand, etc.

  Locational Factors

10.2.20 All types of elderly centres and DEs/DCUs should be located on the ground floor or lower floors of a building in order to be easily accessible by the users. Should they be located above the ground floor level, they should not be more than 24 metres above ground and should be accessible by lifts. Proximity to open space or playground is also preferred.

  Residential Care Homes for the Elderly

10.2.21 Residential Care Homes for the Elderly (RCHEs) are targeted primarily for elders aged 65 or above who have long-term care (LTC) needs and cannot be adequately taken care of at their domestic homes. The key types of residential care places for the elderly are care and attention (C&A) places and nursing home (NH) places. The existing Home for the Aged (H/A) places and Self-care Hostel (S/C) places will be gradually phased out and upgraded into C&A places providing a continuum of care. Also, the trend is for C&A places to provide a continuum of care up to the nursing/infirmary level. At present, an RCHE may comprise a mixture of C&A places and NH places. In future, an RCHE may also comprise infirmary places.

10.2.22 The floor area requirements for different types of residential care places vary. In general, for an RCHE with 100 places, a net operational floor area of 1 096m2 is required. These floor area requirements are for general reference only, and should be applied flexibly.

10.2.23 There should not be a pre-determined standard of provision for residential care places for the elderly based on population as not all elders who have LTC needs require residential care services. The supply of subsidized residential care places should take into account factors such as demand, resources and the availability of premises.

  Locational Factors

10.2.24 RCHEs should be located on the ground floor or lower floors, and should preferably be accessible by its own lifts. Regulation 20 of the Residential Care Homes (Elderly Persons) Regulations stipulates that, unless authorised by the Director of Social Welfare (DSW), no part of an elderly home should be situated at a height more than 24m above ground level.

  Integrated Family Service Centres

  The Standards

10.2.25 To address the problems encountered by families in a more holistic and co-ordinated manner, the Social Welfare Department has in 2004-05 re-engineered the existing family service resources to form Integrated Family Service Centres so that a continuum of services will be provided in a holistic manner to meet the changing needs of individuals and families residing in a designated locality.

10.2.26 An Integrated Family Service Centre adopts a more open, user-friendly, proactive, responsive and flexible approach in providing accessible and integrated services to the public. A continuum of preventive, supportive and remedial services including family life education, parent-child activities, enquiry service, volunteer training and service, outreaching service, mutual help and support groups, counselling and referral service for individuals and families in need, etc. will be provided with extended service hours.

10.2.27 Each Integrated Family Service Centre serves a well-defined service boundary with a population of 100 000 to 150 000 persons, based on a combination of factors including not just the population to be served but also the complexity of social problems and district needs.

10.2.28 Each Integrated Family Service Centre will have a minimum of 12 social workers apart from a supervisor. Depending on the population served and the complexity of social problems in the district, individual Integrated Family Service Centres may have more social workers. According to the approved Schedule of Accommodation, an Integrated Family Service Centre requires a net operational floor area of 535m2 based on a staff strength of 25 to 28 persons of which at least 13 persons are social work staff. The net operational floor area will be adjusted according to individual circumstances including the number of staff in each Integrated Family Service Centre.

  Locational Factors

10.2.29 An Integrated Family Service Centre should be located where population is concentrated and easily accessible by public transport. For the convenience of its service users, a centre should preferably be located close to other social welfare facilities. Ground floor space is preferred for an Integrated Family Service Centre, although other floors served by lifts are also considered suitable.

  Rehabilitation Services for Persons with Disabilities

10.2.30 The overall objective of the rehabilitation policy is to develop the physical, mental and social capabilities of persons with disabilities, and to ensure their full participation and enjoyment of equal rights with a view to promoting their integration into the community. Currently, there is a range of rehabilitation services for persons with disabilities to meet their various needs, including pre-school services, day training and vocational rehabilitation services, residential care services for persons with disabilities and community support services.

  Early Education and Training Centre and Special Child Care Centre

10.2.31 Early Education and Training Centre (EETC) provides services for children with disabilities from birth to six years old, aiming to maximize the development functioning of children with disabilities by enabling their parents, through support and assistance, to accept, understand, care for and train their children with disabilities. Special Child Care Centre (SCCC) provides services for children with moderate and severe disabilities aged between two and six years old, aiming to develop these children’s fundamental developmental skills and intellectual ability, as well as the perceptual-motor, cognitive, communication, social and self-care skills to facilitate their smooth transition from pre-school education to primary education. Residential facilities are available in some SCCCs to cater for the needs of children with disabilities who are homeless, abandoned or dwelling in abject living conditions for family environment.

  Locational Factors

10.2.32 Regulated by the Child Care Services Ordinance & Regulations, no part of the centre premises of SCCC shall be situated at a height of more than 24m above ground level. To ensure that children with disabilities gain easy access to the SCCC, it is preferably located on the ground floor or at podium floor.

  Day Activity Centre

10.2.33 Day Activity Centre provides day care and training for persons with severe intellectual disabilities aged 15 and above who are unable to benefit from vocational training or sheltered employment. They will be trained to become more independent in their daily lives and to prepare them for better integration into the community or for transition to other forms of service or care where appropriate.

  Locational Factors

10.2.34 To facilitate persons with disabilities to receive the day training, the location of these centres should be accessible by public transport services and barrier-free routes.

  Vocational Rehabilitation Services

10.2.35 Vocational rehabilitation services assist persons with disabilities in attaining employment and ensure that they have equal access to participation in productive and gainful employment in the open market. To achieve this goal, the Social Welfare Department provides a wide range of vocational rehabilitation services for them including Sheltered Workshops (SWs) and Integrated Vocational Rehabilitation Services Centres (IVRSCs). SW provides persons with disabilities appropriate vocational training in a specially designed environment and helps them enhance their social and working capacity in order that they can move to supported or open employment whenever possible. IVRSC provides one-stop integrated and seamless vocational training for persons with disabilities in order to achieve upward mobility and prepare them for potential advancement to open employment.

  Locational Factors

10.2.36 To facilitate persons with disabilities to receive the vocational rehabilitation training, the location of these centres should be accessible by public transport services and barrier-free routes. Availability of loading/unloading areas with direct vehicular access is required to support the daily operation.

  Residential Care Services for Persons with Disabilities

10.2.37 Residential care services for persons with disabilities refers to a wide range of residential services for persons with disabilities who cannot live independently and those who cannot be adequately cared for by their families, with a view to improving their quality of life and helping them develop independent living skills.  The services include Hostel for Severely Mentally Handicapped Persons, Hostel for Severely Physically Handicapped Persons, Hostel for Moderately Mentally Handicapped Persons, Supported Hostel for Mentally Handicapped Persons, Supported Hostel for Ex-mentally Ill Persons, Supported Hostel for Physically Handicapped Persons, Care and Attention Home for Severely Disabled Persons, Halfway House, Long Stay Care Home and Small Group Home for Mildly Mentally Handicapped Children.

  Locational Factors

10.2.38 Residential care home for persons with disabilities should be located on the ground floor or lower floors, and should preferably be accessible by its own lifts. No part of a residential care home for persons with disabilities should be situated at a height more than 24m above the street level, measuring vertically from the street level of the building to the floor of the premises in which the residential care home is to be situated.

  District Support Centre for Persons with Disabilities

10.2.39 District Support Centre for Persons with Disabilities, by adopting a district-based approach, provides one-stop community support services for persons with disabilities and their family members/carers. It aims at enhancing the domestic living and community living skills for persons with disabilities so as to facilitate their integration into the community through the provision of a range of community support services. It also provides training and support services to the family members/carers of persons with disabilities so as to strengthen their caring capacity and to relieve their stress.

  Locational Factors

10.2.40 District Support Centre for Persons with Disabilities should be located on the ground floor or lower floors, served by lifts, of a building in order to be easily accessible by the users.

  Integrated Community Centre for Mental Wellness

10.2.41 Integrated Community Centre for Mental Wellness (ICCMW) provides one-stop district-based community support services for persons with mental health problems and their families/carers as well as local residents through a spectrum of services ranging from early prevention to risk management. These include community education, day training, occupational therapy assessment and training, group training/programmes, counselling, outreaching visits and where required, direct liaison with the Hospital Authority for urgent medical consultation to meet the varying needs of service users. Through this integrated service model, the ICCMW aims to improve the service users' social adjustment capabilities, prepare them to re-adjust to community living, help them develop their social and vocational skills and enhance public awareness of the importance of good mental health.

  Locational Factors

10.2.42 An ICCMW should be located where population is concentrated and easily accessible by public transport. For the convenience of its service users, the centre should be barrier-free and preferably be located close to other social welfare facilities. Ground floor space is preferred for an ICCMW although other floors served by lifts are also considered suitable. An ICCMW should be situated at a height no more than 24m above street level.

10.2.43 There should not be a pre-determined standard of provision for the rehabilitation services in a district. The need for these facilities should be determined taking into account not only the size of the population, but also the demographic characteristics, geographical factor, service demand, and worked out in liaison with Social Welfare Department within the context of the Rehabilitation Programme Plan.

  Other Social Welfare Facilities

  The Facilities

10.2.44 In addition to the above, it may be necessary to make special provision for other social welfare facilities such as remand homes, residential care centres, probation hostels etc.  The need for these facilities should be worked out in liaison with the Social Welfare Department.

  Locational Factors

10.2.45 In siting special social welfare facilities, particular regard should be given to aspects of security and compatibility with adjoining uses.

  Environmental Factors

10.2.46 As some of the social welfare facilities such as Child Care Centre and Residential Care Home for the Elderly are sensitive uses, in the planning of site and premises reservation for these facilities, reference should be made to the relevant environmental guidelines and standards contained in Chapter 9 of this document.

10.3 Study Rooms

10.3.1 In general, Government's policy on the provision of study rooms is:

(a) to ensure that an adequate provision of study room facilities is available especially during examination periods; and

(b) to maintain a basic provision of study room facilities throughout the year and to supplement this during periods of peak demand usually prior to major examinations.

10.3.2 At present, study rooms are provided in the following ways: 

(a) A study room of about 200m2 is usually provided in public major/district libraries.

(b) Community centres operated by non-governmental organisations also include study room facilities. Depending on the approved schedule of accommodation, a study room of about 130m2 may be provided in community centres.

(c) Non-governmental organisations operate study rooms in public housing estates with subvention of rents and rates provided by the Education Bureau.

10.3.3 As the demand for study room facilities and the basic provision vary between districts and the utilization fluctuates during the academic year, it is impractical to formulate a standard rate of provision in terms of seats/population or students.

10.3.4 The provision of study room facilities is co-ordinated by the Education Bureau which reviews the demand on an annual basis. Assessment is made primarily by District Council boundaries, although the catchment areas would be adjusted to suit local conditions. Particular attention is paid to the peak demand during examination periods. In addition to upper primary and secondary students, the needs of tertiary students and part-time students taking external examinations should also be considered. Furthermore, the design of study rooms, such as the size and height of the tables and chairs, should be suitable for the intended users such as primary school students.

10.3.5 Study rooms should be conveniently located and readily accessible to the users. They should preferably be located close to or in association with other community facilities. Study rooms for school students could be provided within the school premises.


11. Post Offices

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11.1 Standards 

11.1.1 As a general guide, post offices should be provided so that large groups of population in urban areas should have access to facilities within 1.2km from where they reside or work. For rural areas a distance of 3.2km should be assumed. Other factors to be considered include population in proposed catchment areas; the nature of the terrain over which customers must travel; physical features such as busy main roads and railway lines etc.; the existence of any special social or postal need, and whether the location is being considered as a focal point at which most of the day-to-day needs of the community will be provided. The provision of post offices is subject to the advice of the Postmaster General.

11.2 Locational Factors

11.2.1 Individual sites may, on occasions, be required for postal needs but generally post offices can be incorporated in private and/or government buildings which are centrally located relative to the area served.

11.2.2 All post offices need direct vehicular access and therefore should preferably be located at street level. Offices which have a mail delivery facility should be located near a focal point of public transport, and be provided with facilities for off-street parking for vehicles used in collection and delivery work.

11.2.3 The large urban offices require a separate compound for loading and unloading of mail vans in secure conditions.

11.2.4 Post office premises must always be completely self-contained with no access to non-postal accommodation through any part of the postal areas.


12. Public Mortuaries

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12.1 Standards 

12.1.1 Public mortuaries should provide adequate storage for all bodies received over a period of about 3 weeks, at five bodies per day per million population, plus additional space for use during emergencies or times of disaster. Subject to the availability of suitable sites, the current long-term policy of the Food and Health Bureau is to provide one public mortuary to serve each of the five regions. The regions are:

(a) Hong Kong Island

(b) Kowloon West 

(c) Kowloon East 

(d) New Territories West 

(e) New Territories East

12.1.2 A standard site requirement is not specified as the size of the site required depends on the scale of the proposed public mortuary to be built.

12.1.3 The layout of the mortuary including the vehicular and pedestrian entrances would depend on the architectural design. Two vehicular access points, one for public and the other for servicing, which are physically apart as far as possible should be provided and adequate space should be available for parking and manoeuvring of mortuary vehicles at the access points.

12.2 Locational Factors

12.2.1 Public mortuaries should be provided at locations which are easily accessible by the general public but separated from residential and commercial developments by topographical features and/or such land uses as public services, public utilities or open space. They may often be conveniently grouped with funeral depots and parlours.


13. Funeral Depots and Parlours

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13.1 Standards 

13.1.1 As an approximate guide, one funeral depot site of about 0.25 ha in area should be provided to serve each 350 000 population. A funeral depot is an operating station incorporating a cemetery office, a repository and other facilities for the collection and temporary storage of unclaimed dead bodies pending final disposal. In addition, several sites for commercial funeral parlours of about 50m x 25m (0.125 ha) should be provided to give a choice of facilities and to avoid the creation of monopolies. In a commercial funeral parlour, embalming rooms, reposing rooms and service halls are provided for conducting funeral activities including preparation of bodies, waking and encoffining services and the performance of last rites.

13.2 Locational Factors

13.2.1 For the purpose of convenience to the general public, funeral parlours should be located close to main public transport and traffic routes. However, because of a general public dislike of funeral processions, parlours are best separated from residential and commercial developments by topographical features and/or such land uses as public services, public utilities or open space.

13.2.2 Because some of the activities of funeral depots and parlours are connected with public mortuaries, there are advantages if they are grouped together in funeral services centres. This can also assist in confining the sensitive issue of their location to a lesser number of areas.


14. Summary

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14.1 The standards are summarized in Table 4.



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   Last revision date : October 2015